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ktb
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/10/06
Posts: 435
Location: Boston, MA
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Wednesday, April 02 2014 @ 10:15 AM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin
Shooter's got ya covered there white bread.




Seriously?
billdancourtney
Forum Newbie


Registered: 02/06/14
Posts: 12
Location: Kunming, Yunnan China
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Wednesday, April 02 2014 @ 09:43 PM CDT

Country music does not seem to have benefited from modern hi-tech production techniques in the same way pop and rock have. But on the flip side few people anymore can handle lo-fi production. I have been with people who refuse to watch a b/w movie, much less listen to deliberately under-produced music. There is a video posted here by Sugar Jennings called Lets Put the O Back in Country and I think it is pretty modern country. I don't even know him. Is this Waylon Jenning's son? I mean nice sound, but actually leaning towards the rock sound of things, hard rock at that. And is that a bad thing? Not really I guess. I think for a long time the country and bluegrass pickers were beyond most rock guitarist of the 60's and 70's in technique but that changed after, lets say, Van Halen. Videos and arena shows changed things too. I saw a Garth Brooks video and it had explosions and a light show to rival Deep Purple in their heyday. And yea, it seemed totally different form what I grew up on hearing in San Antonio Texas back in the 70's when Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard ruled the roost.

And that is one other thing too, is most country performers now are pretty attractive, be they male or female. Women in country music (Bobbie Gentry, Lynn Anderson and so on) were attractive in that old beehive hairdo sort of way, but now you have super hot pinup girls basically like Tyler Swift. And the guys too. Were is the craggy faced Johnny Cash's and George Jone's now?

And I can't help but feel that in the vocal area the country twang in the voice is exaggerated a bit too much anymore. The young country turks of today sound more hillbilly than Merle Haggard ever did.

But in the end the reality is record companies have to produce and market what people are going to buy. People want super sexy and perfect production nowadays. I just do not even know one single country performer now and I should, since they seem to have some sort of country award show every other week on TV.

It ain't shiit if it ain't commercial.
magnatone
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/08/08
Posts: 4390
Location: N/A
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Wednesday, April 02 2014 @ 10:43 PM CDT

Quote by: ktb
Quote by: Daugrin
Shooter's got ya covered there white bread.




Seriously?



apparently

my most recent song: "First Light (solo piano)"
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 735
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Monday, April 21 2014 @ 09:21 AM CDT

Quote by: bronco
Lot of good music out there you just have to find it.


Such as right here, for instance.   I’m serious.   I’ve heard some amazingly great music here on MacJams, and it is the creativity that really sticks with me, even though the production values are all over the map.

A big problem with “commercial” music is that it is all the same stuff, just re-packaged.   (Even the same chord progressions, hence the classic Pachabel Rant, now-playing on YouTube.)   So often, when I am listening to music, I want to hear something that is well-done and original, that I haven’t heard before.

Easily the best feature of MJ is the randomizer on the front-page, which serves up a smorgasbord of stuff that is usually quite good but completely unpredictable.   Almost all of the material on my Fave list was accumulated that way, and I have an extremely long list of bookmarks from before I even screwed-up the courage to sign up and contribute anything of my own.   It is also refreshing to me that, even though much of the stuff here is “of commercial-grade quality,” it generally isn’t being contributed by people who have immediate aspirations of selling it.   MJers produce good music and love making and sharing music.   “The life I love is shar-ing mus-ic with my friends ...”   :-D
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1142
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Monday, April 21 2014 @ 10:55 AM CDT

Mr. Robinson's suggestions about the nature of commercial music falls short. Allow me to help him out?

Today's commercial music is first about the control of the marketplace. This notion is just the beginning of understanding the nature of commercial music: this control of the marketplace. Another way of saying this same idea might be, "Follow the money." Doesn't matter about what the product in fact is, or, what culture/sub culture the material may service. Our concern to get into the story here is country music, or better, what country music has become.

White bread country, or, the overly processed, slick, or, low information country, music without the natural nutrients that make music in general healthy (if you will allow dissent and follow my white bread comment of the earlier post), exists to service the largest portion of the music product buying public in the US. This happens to be a demographic that is best described as white female between the ages of the first onset of puberty and 35. Why? Singularly because this group of people commands the largest pool of disposable income.

Shooter Jennings is not complaining so much about this fact as he is upset that the commercial music we are discussing co-opted the "real" or "wholesome" music that he desperately loves and aggressively defends. To Shooter, The Williams boys, and most second generation country musicians the current crop of Hollywood Posers in Nashville trappings don't make country. They make something else. This tension started when the Red Dirt Movement began in the 1980s. Shooter is "retro", or "push back country" by the mere commercial power of the corporate country music. Not an enviable situation?

Why is this discussion important my friends? Could this be a tool to understanding what is going on here at MJ, not just in every genre of commercial music, but also the United States as a whole? In short, obviously yes. From the specific to the general questions then, if this market analysis is correct, and don't forget we are talking about the commercial system, what changes the dynamics, who will resist the changes, who will loose money, importance, power, if the dynamic changes?

Daug

Les_Kloo
Forum Full Member


Registered: 06/24/11
Posts: 216
Location: City in My Head, USA
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Monday, April 21 2014 @ 01:22 PM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin

... who will resist the changes, who will loose money, importance, power, if the dynamic changes?


Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Warner Music Group?

My music is much better than it sounds.
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 735
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Tuesday, April 22 2014 @ 10:31 PM CDT

Personally, I think that “the commercial music industry” is not all-powerful:   it is running scared.   In its heyday, “Nashville, Inc.” could make you a Star – or Not.   They owned, literally, both the only means of distribution and the only means of production.   If their accountants proclaimed that you were now “$300,000 in debt to the label,” and that this was why you wouldn’t be seeing any more checks until Doomsday, then you had to suck-up and take it.   (Just ask Loretta Lynn ...)

Today, they own neither the technology nor the venue.   Their only “sure market” is the morning and the afternoon commute ... unless the car in question is equipped with Sattelite Radio, in which case their only best-shot is either “pablum jazz,” or “near-dead hippie (NDH) Rock,” or a specific-decade slice from any of the (only) three decades in which “a specific-decade slice” ever actually mattered:   70, 80, or (maybe?) 90.

Well, [the heirs of] the stars who got lucky during any of those preceding three decades (and the 60’s) will presumably continue to cash their royalty-checks from BMI until 70-years after the aforementioned stars are dead, but, beyond this, there is absolutely no future in the commercial music industry ... or in the locked-up commercial monopolies that actually profited from it.  

Today, you don’t need a recording-studio.   The most famous studio in California went bankrupt and sold-off its million-dollar (non-automated) console and “1,024 external effects units” to a few aging rockers.   Technologically, it had no commercial value at all, with the possible exception of the legend of a few “rooms.”   And the same could be said of the industry itself: – you don’t need “a record deal” to “make a record” and to make very-serious money from it.   You don’t have to press a piece of vinyl, unless you still want to.  You don’t even have to make a plastic disk and wrap it in one of those damnable(!) plastic shells with its accursed(!! !! !!) little plastic sticky-labels on the top edge.   :-D   All you really need is an MP3-file and a Market.

“The Music Industry” is struggling to re-invent itself in a world where it now enjoys “monopoly power” over, uhhhh, “absolutely nothing.”   Ummm ... stay tuned.   The future promises to be quite interesting.
_key_
Forum Newbie


Registered: 05/11/09
Posts: 1
Location: , United States
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Monday, August 21 2017 @ 10:23 AM CDT

MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 735
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Wednesday, August 23 2017 @ 04:04 PM CDT

Uh huh ... a very(!) worthy successor to “Pachelbel’s Rant!”
 
bronco
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/31/04
Posts: 567
Location: N/A
 
Re:Too bad country music doesn't have this setting now a day
Wednesday, August 23 2017 @ 10:07 PM CDT

Reading this post again and thinking about it again led me to simplify what the difference is in "classic country" and "modern country". To me it comes down to lyrics and an honest singing voice. In the 40's, 50's and 60's there were many different tones and styles that were called country. Listen to Porter Waggoner, Merle Haggard, Whispering Jack Smith, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Hank Snow, Waylon Jennings. They all had their own honest voice which was consistent with their speaking voice. They didn't sound like each other or anyone else. You immediately knew who it was when you heard their voice.

Nowadays all they think they have to do to sound country is put an artificial twang in their voice and sing macho like Hank Williams Jr. and they have got the right sound. The lyrics go along with the voice. Lots of classic country lyrics dealt with real pain in a poetic setting such as Hank Williams Sr. "Hear that lonesome whippoorwill, he sounds to blue to fly". They dealt with the fear of death and the tragedy of life.

Even a pop star like Kenny Rogers could sing a real country song with honesty like Mel Tillis's "Ruby".

"It's hard to love a man whose legs are bent and paralyzed
And the wants and needs of a woman your age, Ruby, I realized
But it won't be long I've heard them say until I'm not around
Oh, Ruby,
Don't take your love to town"

I had an uncle who jumped on a grenade in WWII to save his men and this song cound have been written about him. Nowadays all you hear about are the heros who died for their country, not the ones who lived to regret it.

"It wasn't me that started that old crazy Asian war
But I was proud to go and do my patriotic chore
And yes, it's true that I'm not the man I used to be"

Consider Porter Waggoner whose corny jokes and bizarre costumes would not brand him as a serious artist. But yet he could have a hit song in the 50's with lyrics like these:

"Once I was winning
In fortune and fame
Everything that I dreamed for
To get a start in life's game
Then suddenly it happened
I lost every dime
But I'm richer by far
With a satisfied mind

Money can't buy back
Your youth when you're old
Or a friend when you're lonely
Or a love that's grown cold
The wealthiest person
Is a pauper at times
Compared to the man
With a satisfied mind"

Where is the equivalent to any of this on country radio today?