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Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Saturday, November 17 2007 @ 12:20 PM CST

Quote by: admiralebay
I sometimes feel like as products get "better" (meaning more features, or capable of doing more), it actually makes the music sound more generic because everyone is using these same products to make "their sound".

Not true. The "sound" is in the hands of the songwriter, musician and/or mixer. Stay away from loops and other "canned" effects and you'll have your unique sound. Record live without a metronome. Don't formulize your music. Let it pour from the core.
rover101
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Registered: 12/05/05
Posts: 1622
Location: Yup, Nope Yup
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Saturday, November 17 2007 @ 12:32 PM CST

Quote by: rschletty
Quote by: admiralebay
I sometimes feel like as products get "better" (meaning more features, or capable of doing more), it actually makes the music sound more generic because everyone is using these same products to make "their sound".

Not true. The "sound" is in the hands of the songwriter, musician and/or mixer. Stay away from loops and other "canned" effects and you'll have your unique sound. Record live without a metronome. Don't formulize your music. Let it pour from the core.




YOU DA MAN!

Noli bastardi carborundum
iG.STUDiO
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Registered: 06/17/04
Posts: 229
Location: Manhattan, NY United States
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 07:15 AM CST

Quote by: admiralebay
...you are still using the same foundation as everyone else...it actually makes the music sound more generic because everyone is using these same products to make "their sound"...


It's not what you drive, it's how you steer. Nobody restricts you from experimenting with the tools you have, if the "different sound" is what you want...

iLYA
iG.STUDiO
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Registered: 06/17/04
Posts: 229
Location: Manhattan, NY United States
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 08:14 AM CST

Quote by: TobinMueller

Now people have 25,000 songs on shuffle in their ipod, almost never listen to (or even know) what order the songs appeared in the original recording, and rarely have every song on an album since they don't need to download songs they don't want and can simply skip "less desirable" tunes. That's a big difference.



So true. The album is---or use to be---a singular piece of work, the order of songs is---or use to be---as much important as the order of parts in any given song taken from it. I still listen to albums as a wholes, but I am of an extinct kind, I know.
As for acoustics---I haven't had a decent sound system for a while, except for the one in my car, and I don't drive much lately---job in a City---headphones worked for me always better than anything else...

iLYA
guitapick
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Registered: 01/18/07
Posts: 2031
Location: New York City, USA
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 09:06 AM CST

Quote by: paddler

Very true - and have you heard 'yellow brick road' by Captain Beefheart - If I remember rightly thats a 60's mono type song and its great.I tend to think of mono/stereo as being sort of like the equivalent of black and white to colour.Some of the old 20's 30's recordings of say Noel Coward or Hobart Smith are like crackly black and white films - and classic.


The good Captain is a perfect example. "Alice in Blunderland" has always been an inspiration for me. One of the best guitar solos I've ever heard. Minimalist stuff and pure genius.

I live between the notes

CDBaby "Above the Surface" iTunes Store

guitapick
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Registered: 01/18/07
Posts: 2031
Location: New York City, USA
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 09:16 AM CST

Quote by: TobinMueller
I also find it interesting how we are listening to music differently.

When I was growing up, getting my ears, I would listen to one side of an an LP over and over, maybe 3 dozen times, to soak it in, memorize each note. I almost never lifted the needle since it invariable led to scratches and skips. And I had only a handful of LPs, since I didn't have the money to buy many, but, truly, I only wanted to listen to a handful of albums at a time.

Now people have 25,000 songs on shuffle in their ipod, almost never listen to (or even know) what order the songs appeared in the original recording, and rarely have every song on an album since they don't need to download songs they don't want and can simply skip "less desirable" tunes. That's a big difference.


This could become a question about technology in general, Tobin.

I had a friend in college who's dad was a professor in the music dept. He was a musicologist, too, and one of the preeminent scholars of Bach in the world. They used to ask me to "fix" their stereo...which was:

One of those "drop" turntables with the tuner attached and two cheap RadioShack speakers.

All their records were scratched up...but great recordings. I heard Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin for the first time on that stereo and can't imagine it possibly sounding better on anything else, short of live. Which brings me to the fact that, in that same stereo room, was a Steinway baby grand which they played, nightly, solo or with other musicians on cello/violin/oboe/voice/etc.

Truly a musical community with very little in the way of technical support.

It's strange with technology. Here I sit talking to you folks instead of to my friends here in NYC...though I will be speaking to them later today. You walk out on the street and sooooo many people are in their own iPod or cell phone worlds. Someday there will be a study done on the socialogical impact of this phenomena. Definitely takes people away from the immediate physical/social environment. There are pros and cons which, I'm sure, vary from person to person.

Whew...

I live between the notes

CDBaby "Above the Surface" iTunes Store

Jim Bouchard
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Registered: 02/12/04
Posts: 2019
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 09:39 AM CST

I used to record on a Fostex X15 cassette 4-track and have to bounce things so many times that I had a natural compression before any of the fancy plugins I use now existed. A lot of people were using that same recorder. I don't think the machine had that much to do with the creative sound in my head, but it did shape the way it came out. Despite that I think that the creative output was unique, though shaped by medium I used to realize it.

The OP was saying that "There are only so many products in the market at any given time, so regardless of what style you are playing, you are still using the same foundation as everyone else....it actually makes the music sound more generic because everyone is using these same products to make "their sound"."

That doesn't make sense to me. Actually in the 50s and 60s there were even less options in recording technology, and a lot of the music sounded similar because of it, in terms of engineering. Are we talking recording technology or creative output?
 
J.A.Stewart
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Registered: 11/13/04
Posts: 4560
Location: Somewhere In Time, USA
 
Re:Technology shaping our sound?
Sunday, November 18 2007 @ 01:05 PM CST

While the overall quality of mixes has improved because of technology, I believe it has more to do with the easy temptation to go with *cookie-cutter* mixes that emulate the current popular sound of the moment.

Innovative artists and producers will still introduce different and interesting artistic twists to the soundscape, as they do even here on MacJams. Wink

--- Joe

MY LATEST: A demo version of my Work-In-Progress DAILY GRIND