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Ed Hannifin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3474
Location: , MA USA
 
Gibson Under Juskiewicz
Sunday, September 03 2017 @ 08:51 AM CDT


"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn
VicDiesel
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/14/06
Posts: 2960
Location: Austin, TX
 
Re:Gibson Under Juskiewicz
Sunday, September 03 2017 @ 09:41 AM CDT

"Late last year, Gibson CEO Henry Juszkiewicz told the Nashville Business Journal that Gibson is a "growth company," emphasizing its recent acquisitions"

Gibson is legendary for buying brands and then killing them off because they have no idea what to do with them. Item number one of course being Oberheim. How is TEAC doing? I think the "Metro" sequencer was killed by Gibson. There's a bunch more but google is not being helpful in finding a list which I'm sure exists.

Victor.

-- My CD.
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1141
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Gibson Under Juskiewicz
Sunday, September 03 2017 @ 11:08 AM CDT

Hopefully this will help the conversation...If you fret the fate of Gibson here's some cool licks... and tricks.

Gibson was sold to the present ownership in 1985. Gibson stock is not held on a public exchange. Copy write and legal issues against competitors has been the companies bane since the 1960s (patents on humbucking pick-ups)...

The instrument factory in Memphis still gives tours. The two factories where the high end instruments (acoustic and electric) are created by unknown/mystery genius workers are not open to the public.

The Obama adminstration began an expensive war with Gibson in 2009 which has continued without respite. The leading issue in the conflict is the accusation the Gibson company illegally imported the exotic woods used in the manufacture of professional grade instruments.

Why is Gibson broke? Should we speculate Millennials don't buy Gibson guitars? The market for entry level instruments, which is where Gibson made the bulk of their instruments in the past, is in deep recession. Why? The cultural fascination with Gibson guitars is over? As noted above Gibson is attempting to diversify to meet the challenge of their shrinking market share in a declining business.

If you happen to own a highly sought after Gibson model (or 3 or 4) no need to worry. In times of extreme financial distress, like the times we live in today, fine instruments hold their value against currency, precious metals and art.

Rank speculation again- If Gibson were to fold, except for the legal division which will certainly never finish litigations (hint), the value of traditionally sought after models, as opposed to the first tier crap most of us play everyday, will only increase.

What's it all mean? Billy Gibbon's (ZZ Top) bought the original Pearly Gates, a '59 LP used for $250 in 1968, Billy reports he has been offered $5 million for the guitar by Japanese collectors. He has no idea how many more (too many he suggests) he has bought over the years looking for a second Pearly... who buys high end today?

Daug
VicDiesel
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/14/06
Posts: 2960
Location: Austin, TX
 
Re:Gibson Under Juskiewicz
Sunday, September 03 2017 @ 12:19 PM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin
who buys high end today?



If it's worth it.... Fender & PRS seem to be doing fine with having both budget and top-of-the-line lines. How's Gibson there?

Not playing guitar I have no first-hand (in the original sense of the term) experience with Gibsons, but I'm reading a lot of negative comments on their quality. Maybe they got lazy?

Victor

-- My CD.
 
Ed Hannifin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3474
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Gibson Under Juskiewicz
Monday, September 04 2017 @ 01:35 PM CDT

Just to keep tugging us back to verifiable facts...

The Lacey Act was proposed by a Republican, back in 1900 when Republicans were still often the good guys. It was amended in 2008 and the amendment was put forth as a means of protecting American jobs in the lumber related industries, as well as denoting respect for the laws and resources of developing countries. It was signed into law by George W. Bush, who considers it one of his more stellar achievements. After he signed it, it was law.

Other guitar companies, including Martin and Taylor, enthusiastically embraced and abided by this law.

Gibson under Juskiewicz did not, and in emails were seen to indicate that they knew they were playing fast and loose with the law.

Once caught, however, Juskiewicz tried to both claim that he was somehow the victim, and got John Boehner and others to portray his situation as one of government overreach.

However, despite these political moves, Gibson admitted they were wrong, and paid a fine along with that admission.

President Obama's part of this? Um. People in the Justice Department during his administration did this radical thing. They followed the law.

But you know...haters gotta hate...and then accuse other people of being the haters...

"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn